Stuff I Draw and Other Things

You can ask stuff if you want I guess!  
Jessica, aka Syppah: the Emotionless Crocheting Robot. I'm obsessed with RuPaul's Drag Race so watch out for endless drag queen reblogs!

I also have an art-only blog, as well as a plushie-only blog.

You can find me on Etsy at Syppah's Cute Creations and Syppah's Art Studio.

Click here for Art Posts only.


pastabot:

why are dolls from the 1920’s-50’s always the ones that are haunted?? i wanna see a haunted anime love pillow

(via letoio)

— 16 hours ago with 50834 notes
scissor-happy:

Had a blast doing this color on Lizzie. Can’t wait to see the professional photography! #stylinalyssa #pravanavivids #pravana #custommade #customcolor #merminions #mermaidrealness

scissor-happy:

Had a blast doing this color on Lizzie. Can’t wait to see the professional photography! #stylinalyssa #pravanavivids #pravana #custommade #customcolor #merminions #mermaidrealness

(via hairismyobsession)

— 1 day ago with 3453 notes
Anonymous asked: Do you ever think you'll stop drawing fanart? No offense it just seems like the kind of thing you're supposed to grow out of. I'm just curious what your plans/goals are since it isn't exactly an art form that people take seriously.


Answer:

euclase:

Ah, fanart. Also known as the art that girls make.

Sad, immature girls no one takes seriously. Girls who are taught that it’s shameful to be excited or passionate about anything, that it’s pathetic to gush about what attracts them, that it’s wrong to be a geek, that they should feel embarrassed about having a crush, that they’re not allowed to gaze or stare or wish or desire. Girls who need to grow out of it.

That’s the art you mean, right?

Because in my experience, when grown men make it, nobody calls it fanart. They just call it art. And everyone takes it very seriously.

— 1 day ago with 5391 notes
taxigermy:

My hair back in 2012. I was so proud of this shit and it literally took me over 6 hours to get everything done. Dyed everything myself and even hand washed some spots to avoid bleeding colors together. Lasted about 3 months. All of it except the bright green (cant see) was Splat hair dye.
Once my hair’s un-fried, I’m definitely doing rainbow again. 

taxigermy:

My hair back in 2012. I was so proud of this shit and it literally took me over 6 hours to get everything done. Dyed everything myself and even hand washed some spots to avoid bleeding colors together. Lasted about 3 months. All of it except the bright green (cant see) was Splat hair dye.

Once my hair’s un-fried, I’m definitely doing rainbow again. 

(via hairismyobsession)

— 2 days ago with 116 notes
"For many of these women, the reading experience begins from a place of seething rage. Take Sara Marcus’ initial impression of Jack Kerouac: “I remember putting On the Road down the first time a woman was mentioned. I was just like: ‘Fuck. You.’ I was probably 15 or 16. And over the coming years I realized that it was this canonical work, so I tried to return to it, but every time I was just like, ‘Fuck you.’” Tortorici had a similarly visceral reaction to Charles Bukowski: “I will never forget reading Bukowski’s Post Office and feeling so horrible, the way that the narrator describes the thickness of ugly women’s legs. I think it was the first time I felt like a book that I was trying to identify with rejected me. Though I did absorb it, and of course it made me hate my body or whatever.” Emily Witt turned to masculine texts to access a sexual language that was absent from books about women, but found herself turned off by their take: “many of the great classic coming-of-age novels about the female experience don’t openly discuss sex,” she says in No Regrets. “I read the ones by men instead, until I was like, ‘I cannot read another passage about masturbation. I can’t. It was like a pile of Kleenex.”

This isn’t just about the books. When young women read the hyper-masculine literary canon—what Emily Gould calls the “midcentury misogynists,” staffed with the likes of Roth, Mailer, and Miller—their discomfort is punctuated by the knowledge that their male peers are reading these books, identifying with them, and acting out their perspectives and narratives. These writers are celebrated by the society that we live in, even the one who stabbed his wife. In No Regrets, Elif Bautman talks about reading Henry Miller for the first time because she had a “serious crush” on a guy who said his were “the best books ever,” and that guy’s real-life recommendation exacerbated her distaste for the fictional. When she read Miller, “I felt so alienated by the books, and then thinking about this guy, and it was so hot and summertime … I just wanted to kill myself. … He compared women to soup.”"

In No Regrets, women writers talk about what it was like to read literature’s “midcentury misogynists.” (via becauseiamawoman)

Here’s a fun thing you learn when you study literature: the western canon is not universally beloved. Those books are not the Truth any more than the New York Post is skilled journalism. The main reason they’re held in such high esteem is because they were written by boring white dudes with rage fantasies and boring white dudes with rage fantasies also happen to be largely in charge of deciding which books are deemed classics and taught forever in the American school system.
So if your boyfriend tells you he loves Kerouac then you tell your boyfriend Kerouac was a fucking second rate hack who wrote Beat style because he didn’t have the skill or talent to write any other way, which is probably also why he just copied every adolescent male wanderlust story since the beginning of time. That shit’s derivative and boring.

(via saintthecla)

Everyone go read this immediately. As I decided last week, my life motto has been expanded from “Do your thing and don’t care if they like it” to include “If all your favorite books are by white men, I probably don’t think you’re a very interesting person.”

(via hardcockatoo)

(via hardcockatoo)

— 2 days ago with 12516 notes
"Back in the day, Walter would, every once in a while, forget how to draw. Remember?" Louise said.

“Oh yeah,” Walter agreed. “That still happens occasionally. It’s like, ‘Oh my god, nothing I’m drawing looks any good anymore. My life is over as an artist.’ And what I realized, because I was an editor at the time, and had seen a lot of work go past me, was that when you hit this phase where suddenly your stuff, which looks just like it did yesterday, doesn’t look good to you anymore, it’s because your mind has made a leap. Your brain has gotten farther than your hand has learned to do it yet. But eventually, give it a few weeks, keep it up and you’ve made a leap in your own craft. That was a big help because it was so depressing when you realize you couldn’t draw anymore."
— 2 days ago with 1083 notes